The Grim Truth of Fast Fashion

The Grim Truth of Fast Fashion

In Australia, $6 billion in textile, apparel, and footwear products are produced annually. People are starting to think about their wardrobes from a more eco-conscious perspective. It might be necessary for clothing and textile technologists to come to an agreement on introducing a new, more sustainable method to their manufacturing operations. The production of clothing uses 79 billion cubic meters of fresh water annually. Between 4% and 10% of the world's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are produced during the process of making garments. 43 million tonnes of chemicals are used during clothing production, in processes such as dyeing and finishing treatments.

 

Fast fashion is the most glaring example of the many crimes against people and the environment that the fashion industry as a whole is accountable for. Some fast fashion brands may be using eco-friendly tags and labels for the wrong reasons. Misleading claims make it difficult for consumers to make informed choices. Some businesses appear to be more concerned with projecting an impression of being a brand that cares about the environment. The average annual waste rate for clothing in Australia is 93%, and just 7% of the clothing purchased there is recycled. Retailers are integrating "buy, swap, sell" pages into their websites to expand the opportunities for clothing reuse. In order to move toward a circular economy, the federal government has set various objectives.

 

Although society's fixation with shopping may make quitting difficult, there are better alternatives. An alternative is provided by slow fashion like Modistas, which uses conscious production methods, fair labor practices,100% lotus silk  materials, long-lasting clothing, including vertical integration and in-house production. It is energizing to know that there are many other organizations, groups, and people battling for the environment and the security of garment workers. We may assure agency and that we're advocating for the environment supporting social responsibility and accountability.

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